Differing Approaches Of Nursing Leaders And Managers To Issues In Practice Research Paper:
 Over the past few years, managers in the nursing fraternity have been using different approaches to solve emerging issues or nurse-related issues in their areas of jurisdiction. The main aim of these approaches is to ensure that nurses work in an environment which is favorable and above all in an effective and above all in a proper manner. Well, the issue of nurse shortage and nurse turn-over will be tackled in this essay and in addition to these two issues, I will make a comparison between different theories, principles and skills to be used by managers to handle or to solve nurse shortage and nurse turn-over issue. Lastly, I identify the approach that best fits my personal and professional philosophy of nursing
Nurse shortage and Nurse Turn-Over Issue
            One of the questions which are frequently asked in our society is, “Is there a nursing shortage in the U.S.?” Well, it is unfortunate that the answer for this question is a simple yes. Research indicates that the United States of America experiences a big shortage of the Registered Nurses (RNs). This has negative effect on Baby Boomers age and above all the need for health care in the United States of America. The dynamics behind the demand and supply of nurse in the United States of America are dependent on several forces such as Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement among others. What have complicated the issue of nurse shortage in the United States of America are the variations of health delivery systems in different states or in different parts of the United States of America. Increased acuity of hospital patients, Hospital consolidation, increasingly competitive health care environment, and downsizing and reengineering are some of the main factors that are responsible for nurse shortage in the United States of America (Feldman, 2003).
The problem of nurse shortage in the United States of America is alarming thus the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) is currently working with nursing organizations, policy makers, media, and schools to sensitize the public and the government on this healthcare concern. In addition to this, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) is leveraging the available resources that is essential or which will help when stakeholders and policy makers will be addressing nurse shortage in the United States of America. In fact the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has developed a fact sheet showing the rate at which nurse shortage is alarming (Feldman, 2003).
When it comes to the issue of nurse-turn over, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) have identified three main causes and they include: personal reasons, staffing, and relationship between registered nurses and stakeholders in various hospitals. When it comes to personal reasons, nurses have been resigning or leaving their places of work because of their interest in getting a better pay. Some of the nurses opt to operate in private entities because there is a believe that they will be earning a lot of profits as compared to a situation whereby they are employed by the government (Finkler & McHugh, 2008).
Punke (2013) argues when it comes to the issue of staffing, nurses especially employed in the public hospitals do believe that they are given a lot of work yet their number is less as compared to other professionals working with them in the hospital. Lastly is the issue of relationship whereby a number of nurses are not in good terms with their managers or with physicians who have been employed by the hospital. As a result of these poor relationships, some nurses decide to quite their job and look for another one.
Compare and Contrast Different Theories, Principles, Skills Would Use By Nursing Leaders/Managers to Approach Nurse Shortage Nurse Turn-Over Issue
Managers employed by different hospitals to ensure that nurses work effectively have to make use of different theories, principles, and skills in order to make sure the problem of nurse shortage and nurse-turnover is solved amicably. It will be a prudent idea for nurse managers to equip themselves with good communication skills. This is essential in that they will be in a better position to understand the problems facing nurses in their respective place of work. In addition to this, good communication skills will help nurse managers to solve relationship issues between nurses and physicians as well as between nurses and the nurse managers themselves (Wright, Bretthauer & Côté, 2006).
The other essential principle which will help nurse managers to solve the issue of nurse shortage and nurse turn-over is for them to conduct a survey. By doing this, nurse managers will be in a position to take note of some of the causes of these two main issues. Similarly, data collected will help these managers to come up with a strategy that will solve these problems. For example, recommendations on better pay and good working conditions will help them to solve nurse shortage and nurse turn-over issue (Punke, 2013). In addition to this, through the survey, nurse managers will be in a position to identify the best avenues that will help to ensure that the relationship between nurses and other professionals in the hospital is positive.
Furthermore, there is an urgent need for nurse managers to ensure that their respective hospitals are equipped with a software system. This software system will be helpful in the recruitment of nurses because they will be in a position to know the number of nurses that are needed to be employed. In addition to this, the software system will help them to monitor nurse turn-over in that roles and responsibilities among nurses and other employees will be distributed equally thus cases of overload will be avoided and the number of nurses resigning will be minimized (Pham & Klinkert, 2008).
Best Fits Approach
Considering the fact that, we have identified different approaches to be used by nurse managers who are tasked with the responsibility to ensure that nurse shortage and nurse turn-over is something of the past, I do believe that communication is an essential tool. In this case, nurse managers should ensure that, communication between them and the nurses is two way. Nurses should be allowed to raise their concern without being subjected to any form or any kind of intimidation at all. By doing this, nurse managers will be in a position to find the best solution to the problem of nurse shortage and nurse turn-over in their hospitals (Boyle & Kochinda, 2004).
Conclusion
The problem of nurse shortage and nurse-turnover in our hospitals is alarming. Nurse Managers should work hand in hand with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) as well as with the stakeholders and government officials in coming up with the best solutions to this problem. Unless immediate action is taken, the health sector on the verge of falling into a limbo. As noted above, communication is an essential tool, therefore, managers should embrace dialogue and they will rest assured of getting the root causes of these two main issues. In short, the issue of nurse shortage and nurse turn-over can be solved if managers, stakeholder, the general public and government authorities will work hand in hand.
References
Boyle, D. K., & Kochinda, C. (2004). Enhancing collaborative communication of nurse and physician leadership in two intensive care units. Journal of Nursing Administration, 34(2), 60-70.
Feldman, H. R. (2003). The nursing shortage: Strategies for recruitment and retention in clinical practice and education. New York: Springer Pub.
Finkler, S. A., & McHugh, M. L. (2008). Budgeting concepts for nurse managers. St. Louis, Mo: Saunders/Elsevier.
Pham, D. N., & Klinkert, A. (2008). Surgical case scheduling as a generalized job shop scheduling problem. European Journal of Operational Research, 185(3), 1011-1025.
Punke, H. (2013). 3 Biggest Causes of Nurse Turnover. Retrieved from: www.beckershospitalreview.com/workforce-labor-management/3-biggest-causes-of-nurse-turnover.html
Wright, P. D., Bretthauer, K. M., & Côté, M. J. (2006). Reexamining the nurse scheduling problem: Staffing ratios and nursing shortages. Decision Sciences, 37(1), 39-70.
 
 

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